Monthly Archives: January 2014

Ask Bajan Mom: Corporal Punishment

Q: Dear Bajan Mom, could you do an article on corporal punishment? I was told that children still get ‘lashes’ in Barbados. I have never laid a hand on my son and I am very concerned about how it would affect him if or when I return to the island. Say No To Beatings

A: Dear Say No To Beatings,

I understand your concerns. It is not an easy thing to place your child in someone else’s hands, moreover, when their values and modes of care may differ from your own. Yes, what you have heard is true, corporal punishment still exists in Barbadian schools, but it is not the first course of action as it was in days of yore.

The days of the classroom teacher beating children at will have dissipated. Only senior teachers and principals are allowed to administer the rod so the child is not spoiled. From what I understand, even when disciplinary problems are brought to senior management, the behavior must be especially egregious for the right to lash to be exercised. Some senior educators have become more sensitive to a nurturing approach to discipline, and Barbadians are more litigious than they once were, so an air of caution exists.

It would be remiss of me not to add that we as parents have a responsibility to raise our children in such a way that they do not end up in front of the principal for punitive reasons. Well-behaved, respectful children tend to avoid corporal punishment; this is not to say that injustice may never occur.

The parent-teacher relationship should be a collaborative one. Get to know your child’s new principal and class teacher well. That way, if a troubling issue arises, it is more likely that they would seek your input as the first approach instead of using the methods that you dread.

Best wishes,

Bajan Mom

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These puppies need a home

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These puppies were brought to the RSPCA this week. For more information, click here.

Doctor Recommendation Issue

Dear Readers,

Some of you have perused the Doctor Directory and have asked me which doctors I recommend in particular. Unfortunately, due to regulations preventing medical practitioners from advertising in Barbados, I have been advised that it actually may not be in these doctors’ interest since my recommendations may cause them to face disciplinary action. The scope for “advertisement” is quite wide and varied. I apologise for the inconvenience but hope that the directory still proves to be useful to you, and that you continue to enjoy reading the articles here at bajanmom.wordpress.com.

Best wishes,

Bajan Mom

HANDLING LAYOFFS WITH CONSIDERATION AND GRACE

            This article has been inspired by the current climate in the Barbados Labour market. If one is moving back to Barbados, it cannot be with blinders. Have a job lined up before you come or be sure that you have significant savings if you want to move first and search for employment after. For those who are already here as business persons, and are facing financial challenges which may require that you must terminate employees, remember that there are methods that encourage all parties to handle a difficult situation with grace.

It should be no surprise to anyone that terminations are traumatic experiences. For example, a recent news article mentioned the fainting of a Drainage Division worker on hearing she would be laid off. To be laid-off means more than losing a job or losing money. It means the disruption of many facets of one’s life including family challenges which may arise due to the economic and emotional strain that has been introduced. Simply put, a person’s life is turned upside-down. The experience may be less jolting, however, with proper management.

Wayne F. Cascio, a Distinguished University Professor at the University of Colorado and a prolific writer, states in his book, Managing Human Resources, that when creating policies in regards to layoffs, that one should consider the impact on several groups inclusive of those who are leaving and those who remain. He purports the need for “face-to-face, candid, open communication” between senior management and staff. He encourages preparation and support for those who will be laid-off, helping them through their transition. He also recommends openness with the survivors of layoffs to cultivate trust in order to boost morale and help them to feel more secure, loyal, motivated and productive.

Raymond A. Noe, a training and development specialist, endorses these thoughts in his text, Employee Training and Development, and takes it even further. He notes that research has shown that layoffs do not result in increased profits, but that they can have an adverse effect on productivity, work load, commitment and morale of workers. He suggests that alternative ways to reduce labour costs should be considered first, such as fewer working hours for employees, early retirement plans, delayed wage increases and not filling positions created by retirement and turnover. If these methods prove fruitless and layoffs are inevitable then it is the responsibility of management to adequately prepare all workers while trying to diminish any negative consequences.

If certain courtesies are extended, such as advance notice, clear and adequate explanations, and provisions for psychological, financial and career counselling, there are benefits to all parties. Those to be laid-off are not caught off-guard, are given time to make other arrangements and are even given resources to make the transition easier. Those who remain employed will have better attitudes and should maintain productivity once a sense of fairness has been exhibited. Furthermore, the reputation of the employer remains relatively unsullied if this approach is taken.

Timing is also important. Noe suggests that termination announcements should not be made on Friday afternoons, very late on any day or before a holiday. He advises that termination should happen early in the week to facilitate employees receiving counselling and possibly outplacement assistance.

Employees should also be aware of their rights and privileges. For example, they should know what to expect from Barbados labour legislation such as the Severance Payments Act or any benefits to be expected from National Insurance. They should also know where to access services such as the Government-funded Employee Assistance Programme for public workers. Ideally, if there is open communication, transparency, honest and fair treatment, the result of the retrenchment transition should leave all with their dignity intact.

Bajan Mom has a background in Psychology and MSc in Management

BUSINESS REVIEW: Electronics on Edge

Electronics on Edge

                 When we returned to Barbados, my husband and I regretted that we did not buy unlocked cell phones before we had left the US. Our old phones definitely needed an upgrade, and at the time, we had not been familiar with the stores that unlocked cell phones so a purchase was definitely needed (since then I have seen unlocking services offered by stores in Swan Street and another on St. Micahel’s Rowe. I went online and researched phone prices, plans and special promotions offered by the island’s two cellular service providers, Digicel and LIME. Since many people we knew had a Digicel phone, it was more cost-effective for us to subscribe to their services but purchasing a phone from that company, or its rival, did not seem to be the most economic. After some online research and discussions with some good friends, we settled on purchasing our new phones from Electronics on Edge in Bridgetown, a retail enterprise that sells electronics and accessories.

                             The store is easy to find, opposite Cave Shepherd underneath its monochromatic sign. As I entered, I was struck by its clean simplicity. It is a bright, narrow space lined with long glass display cases on either side, shelves gracing one of its walls, and the customer service desk straight ahead, fully in the customer’s line of vision from the entrance.

                             I said “Good morning” to the young ladies near the entrance, sitting behind the glass cases to my right. One mumbled, the others said nothing. Not a good first impression. I went to the customer service desk where I was greeted, with a smile, by two others. I knew what I wanted and asked for it. The products were brought to me, by the mumbling young lady from the beginning of my experience, so that I could inspect them. Once I was satisfied, one of the customer service ladies told me she would give me the phones at a particular price. A good sales tactic which made it seem as if I was getting a good deal, which would have worked if I had not pored over their website for days and was already aware that the price she offered was the asking price. I smiled, made my purchase and signed under the 3 month warranty offered by the store on its phones. I would be remiss not to mention the free screen protector that I was given and that the young lady who showed me the phones turned out to be quite polite. I left the store pleased.

                             Unfortunately, the phones had a few issues that were diagnosed after purchase. In synopsis, after the technician did his best to figure out what was going on, the phones were exchanged with no problems. The technician was polite and professional. He answered all of my questions fully, which was helpful. I had been unable to go back to the store myself to exchange my phone, but my husband, who did so for me, reported that the owner himself was apologetic. We were also given adapters for our phone chargers since one was designed for Latin American electrical outlets and the other for Asian ones. It also gives a clue to why Electronics on Edge can afford to be fairly reasonably priced.

                             Since then I returned and purchased iPad accessories which are serving me well. Overall, Electronics on Edge is a valid option in cellphone retail. The store presents well, reminding me of the smooth edges of the electronics it sells. The products are properly displayed and easy to find. The business also has integrity, honouring its warranties and investigating issues thoroughly. The technician is knowledgeable, and he and the ladies behind the customer service desk are professional.

                             The kink in E on E’s armour would be the ladies in the front. They are the store’s first representatives and it would help if they are more engaging; nothing that some customer service training cannot correct. In the end, I give Electronics on Edge three and a half Barbados flags out of five for its affordability, presentation, customer service and business integrity. One and a half stars were deducted for the first impression and the trips that had to be made back and forth to the store due to initial challenges with the phones’ function and chargers which could not fit electrical outlets in Barbados.

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Is Partial Zoning Impartial Zoning?

As referenced in a former article, secondary schools in Barbados are separated into three zones:

Zone 1 – Parishes of St. Lucy, St. Peter, St. James and parts of St. Thomas (west of Highway of 2A) and parts of St. Michael (please see 2014 Guide for more details)

·        Alexandra

·        Alma Parris

·        Coleridge & Parry

·        Darryl Jordan Secondary (formerly St. Lucy Secondary)

·        Ellerslie

·        Frederick Smith Secondary (formerly St. James Secondary)

·        Queen’s College

·        Springer Memorial (girls only)

·        St. Leonard’s Boys (boys only)

Zone2 – Parishes of St. Andrew, St. Joseph, St. George, St. Thomas (east of Highway 2A) and parts of St. Michael (please see 2014 Guide for more details)

·        Alleyne

·        Combermere

·        Grantley Adams

·        Harrison College

·        Parkinson Memorial

·        Springer Memorial (girls only)

·        St. George Secondary

·        St. Leonard’s Boys’ (boys only)

·        The Lester Vaughan School

Zone 3 – The parishes of St. John, St. Philip and Christ Church

·        Christ Church Foundation

·        Deighton Griffith

·        Graydon Sealy Secondary (formerly Garrison)

·        The Lodge School

·        Princess Margaret

·        Springer Memorial (girls only)

·        St. Leonard’s Boys’ (boys only)

·        The St. Michael School

Parents are given two open options, then the others must be chosen from one’s zone. If these zones are carefully examined, it is revealed that Zones 1 and 2 are more limited in access to the island’s top tier schools. Whereas Zone 3 could easily have 5 of the top six schools represented in its choices, Zones 1 and 2 may only have 2 and 3 as a maximum respectively.

For example, if a parent from Zone 1 would like to make a choice based on the traditional ranking of schools, the choices would be Harrison College, Queen’s College (ranked 1st and 2nd), then the next choice would have to be Alexandra (7th). A Zone 2 parent, making a similar choice would select Harrison College, Queen’s College, Combermere and the Alleyne (1st, 2nd, 4th, and 9th). A Zone 3 parent may select Harrison College, Queen’s College, St. Michael’s, Christ Church Foundation, and the Lodge School (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th).

A Zone 1 parent may ask, so what if I decided to go with Harrison College and St. Michael School as my first and 2nd choices and put Queen’s as my third? Would I not have 3 choices then? Yes and no.  Unfortunately, the way how the computer that issues the allocations work, it would mean that you are essentially forfeiting Queen’s College. The computer is programmed to allocate based on school preference as well as grades. So if St. Michael School is your second choice and Queen’s College is your third, those people who have Queen’s as a first and second choice will fill the Queen’s College spaces first. Therefore, by the time the computer gets to your child, all of the allotted spaces for that school may be full.

A Zone 2 parent may ask, if I put Queen’s College and the St. Michael School as my first two choices, and Harrison College and Combermere as my third and fourth, would that not increase my top-tier choices to four? Again, as discussed in the previous paragraph, by making Harrison College your child’s third choice, you are forfeiting the school. Even if your child achieves “Harrison College marks”, just by putting Harrison College as a third choice, it is likely your child will miss the allocation for that school and be sent to his/her first choice instead.

As it currently stands, the best tactic is to keep tabs on your child’s performance in school and make choices based on the schools you believe will best fit his/her needs. You have to work with what you have. If you had a choice though, what would you prefer? Take the poll below and let yourself be heard.

Ask Bajan Mom: Buying Cars in Barbados

Q: Hi there, Bajanmom. This is my first time commenting but I have been reading your posts for a couple of weeks now. My question is,  what are car prices like in Barbados? I am trying to figure out if I should buy a car here or in Barbados after I move. Thanks. UKB

A: UKB, thank you for your question. I wish you had given me more information like your age, where you live, how long you lived overseas,  and when you are planning to move to Barbados. Information like that would help me to understand if you fall under the rights and privileges of returning nationals or not and also assist in making price comparisons. That said, I will answer you to the best of my ability.

Let me address your first question first. I have found that, due to Barbadian taxes and duties, that Barbadian vehicles are almost four times more expensive than those in the US. When I was in the States I visited US and Barbadian car dealership websites, which gave me an idea about costs. I also called dealerships in Barbados to ask if they would be able to service the particular brand or model I was investigating, since these are factors to consider as well. So, for example, let us look at the 2014 Toyota Rav 4. In the US, according to www.toyota.com, this vehicle’s 2.5L Gasoline engine model’s starting price is US$23,550, that is roughly BD$47,100. In Barbados, the 2013 model of similar engine size retails for a starting price of BD$166,995 or US$83,497.50. If my maths serves me correctly, the 2013 Rav4 in Barbados is 3.5 times plus more expensive than its 2014 equivalent in the US.

I should warn you, however, that your decision to purchase your vehicle overseas is not as simple as which country has cheaper vehicles. If you are a returning national (see criteria here), you will be allowed ONE motor vehicle free of all duties and taxes with certain restrictions. If the car is used, it cannot be more than four years old or have more than 50,000 kms on the odometer unless you have proof that you owned it at least four years before importation. If it is new, the vehicle must be retained for at least three years. Each year you must provide proof from the Licensing Authority that the vehicle is still registered in your name.

If you are not a returning national, expect 45% import duty, an environmental levy determined by whether your vehicle is new or used, 17.5% Valued Added Tax, an excise tax based on engine size and port charges. Furthermore, depending on where you live, you may want to import a left-hand drive vehicle. If so, please note that the insurance for left-hand drive vehicles in Barbados is considerably more than their right-hand drive counterparts. If you will incur taxes and duties anyway, getting a right-hand drive in Barbados may be a better choice for you. In terms of the type of vehicle you may want to purchase, you also need to consider road tax which increases in accordance to the vehicle’s weight.

I cannot make your decision for you, but I hope that the information that I have provided will assist you in some way. Some Barbadian car dealership sites you may want to visit are Nassco, Simpson Motors, and McEnearney.

Best wishes,

Bajan Mom

Barbados Secondary School Entrance Examination (Common Entrance) 2014 – Town Hall Meeting Recap, Partial Zoning & Ranking the Nation’s Schools

               The Ministry of Education has issued its annual Government Secondary Schools in Barbados guide. To complement the booklet, there are a number of town hall meetings currently being conducted all over the island. For information on times, dates and locations of these meetings click here. For those who may be unable to attend these meetings, here is some vital data to consider. This information is based on one of the town hall meetings, and supplemented with information from the Ministry of Education’s 2014 Guide and my own research.

Date & Time

The Barbados Secondary School Entrance Examination (BSSEE) takes place on May 6, 2014 at 9:00 am at Public Secondary Schools all over the island. It is estimated that the exam should finish around 12:45 pm.

Eligibility

Students taking the exam must be eleven (11) by August 31, 2014. Barbadian students born overseas need to produce a certificate indicating their Barbadian descent so that they may do the exam. Non-nationals are required to submit the Immigration status certificates of the parent and child to the Ministry of Education through the school the child attends. They should have a student visa (cost BD$300). Please note that non-nationals are required to pay tuition of Bd$340 a term to their school unless parents are employed by an international organisation such as embassies and the University of the West Indies.

Exceptions

                              A request may be made for ten-year olds (early sitters) to sit the exam. This request is to be made by the parent, not the school. The school should only act in an advisory capacity. The student must have knowledge of the entire syllabus and must have scored at least 85% in Mathematics and English for 6 terms, i.e. both Class 2 and Class 3 academic years. If the potential candidate has earned slightly below 85% on occasion, an exception is considered. A senior education officer will go to the child’s school to check on that child’s report books to decide if the criteria have been met. Please note that parents must be sure that the child is adequately prepared since the BSSEE may only be done once. There is no opportunity for the child to sit the examination a second time.

                              On the opposite side of the spectrum, a request to defer may also be made. To defer, the child must be 11 years old. Only one deferral is allowed and no child should be more than twelve in that year. Deferral is based on the opinion of the Principal that the child would benefit from an extra year of elementary school study. The criteria for deferral include the student’s consistent scoring of 20% or less in English and Mathematics over 6 consecutive months preceding the BSSEE, or that the student has missed large portions of the curriculum due to illness, trauma or learning difficulties.

Exemptions

                              Mentally challenged students are exempt from the examination. All requests for exemption should be submitted through the Principal of the child’s school and be accompanied by a full psychological evaluation or medical report. The reports should have been completed within 6 months of said request. The student should be unable to read at the level of a Class 1 pupil, should be unable to recognise numbers and perform basic mathematical functions, or the child must have a mental age that is less than 8 years old. The Ministry of Education makes the final decision on if the student has met these criteria.

                              Academic options for such students include Annexes available at both Ellerton and Charles F. Broomes Primary Schools, and the Ann Hill School.

Special Needs

                              Students who need an enlarged print on the paper or extra time due to medical conditions should submit a request at the same time they submit their choice of school forms. A maximum of 15 minutes extra will be given to dyslexic students.

Illness

                              If a child is ill and cannot attend the examination, arrangements will be made for the child to sit an alternative exam. If the child becomes ill after the first 30 minutes of the examination, the child will be marked as present and the completed exam paper will be evaluated to determine a grade.

 BSSEE Choice of Schools Form

Choice of School Forms

                              As can be seen in the form above, when selecting schools, parents have two open options from anywhere in the island and up to seven choices from their zone. These zones are as follows:

Zone 1 – Parishes of St. Lucy, St. Peter, St. James and parts of St. Thomas (west of Highway of 2A) and parts of St. Michael (please see 2014 Guide for more details)

·        Alexandra

·        Alma Parris

·        Coleridge & Parry

·        Darryl Jordan Secondary (formerly St. Lucy Secondary)

·        Ellerslie

·        Frederick Smith Secondary (formerly St. James Secondary)

·        Queen’s College

·        Springer Memorial (girls only)

·        St. Leonard’s Boys (boys only)

Zone2 – Parishes of St. Andrew, St. Joseph, St. George, St. Thomas (east of Highway 2A) and parts of St. Michael (please see 2014 Guide for more details)

·        Alleyne

·        Combermere

·        Grantley Adams

·        Harrison College

·        Parkinson Memorial

·        Springer Memorial (girls only)

·        St. George Secondary

·        St. Leonard’s Boys’ (boys only)

·        The Lester Vaughan School

Zone 3 – The parishes of St. John, St. Philip and Christ Church

·        Christ Church Foundation

·        Deighton Griffith

·        Graydon Sealy Secondary (formerly Garrison)

·        The Lodge School

·        Princess Margaret

·        Springer Memorial (girls only)

·        St. Leonard’s Boys’ (boys only)

·        The St. Michael School

                              The zone is based on one’s mailing address and it is illegal to change the address to get into a different zone. Allocations are done by computer so be sure that the schools that are truly desired for your child are your first choices. The computer is programmed to select based on the order of the choices, the score of the examination, and the criterion that 30% of a school’s allocation must be from its zone. Once a school’s quota has been filled, the computer moves on to the next option, so choose carefully. Also, do not choose Bursary unless you can pay private school tuition. The bursary amount is a mere $125 a term.

                              There is an attempt by the Ministry of Education to eradicate the notion that there is any difference among the schools. Furthermore, it is purported that it should not matter where a child goes to school since any school is one where one’s child will be taught. I understand their well-intentioned efforts, however, in my opinion, that concept is quashed by the existence of cut-off marks. A disparity in cut-off marks suggests a hierarchical structure which puts students of similar academic abilities together. Therefore, if one’s child consistently scores 95% in English and Mathematics, should that child go to a school with a cut-off mark of 50% because that is the school closest to him/her?

                              The answer to that question is left to the parents. Based on information gathered about the general trend of cut-off marks for schools, this seems to be the ranking of the nation’s top 10:

·        Harrison College (Zone 2)

·        Queen’s College (Zone 1)

·        St. Michael’s (Zone 3)

·        Combermere (Zone 2)

·        Christ Church Foundation (Zone 3)

·        The Lodge School (Zone 3)

·        Alexandra (Zone 1)

·        Coleridge & Parry (Zone 1)

·        Alleyne (Zone 2)

·        Ellerslie (Zone 1)

I hope this information has been helpful to you and I wish your child an anxiety-free, successful examination.

BUSINESS REVIEW: Diva The Salon

            As a woman, one of the services that I like to procure when living in a new area is that of a beauty salon. Whether hair is curly or straight; whether you want a wash, relaxer, treatment or weave; whether you go to the salon often or it is a rare treat, just knowing that you have somewhere to go when you have the need is a relief. I sport a natural hairstyle but for years, while overseas, I would go to the salon and have a full-head weave done to protect my hair from harsh, dry, wintry elements this time of year. Although Barbados is warm and humid, I have found that my hair flourishes when I allow it to rest for a couple of months, so I started to ask around and research a beauty salon that would fit my needs.  

            After scouring the internet, making some calls, and having numerous conversations with different women, I settled on ‘Diva the Salon’ in Bridgetown. When some salon owners/employees at other establishments answered their telephones, I got a ‘hello’ or even a ‘Yeah?’ which made me have to ask for confirmation about where I had called. Either the owner of Diva, Andrea, enforced customer service training to her staff, or they are just naturally polite, but your first impression when calling is that you are calling a business. One is greeted with a good morning or good afternoon, and the business is identified.

            Diva has an attractive appearance as well. It is located a few doors down from the Waterfront Café with a relaxing, scenic view of the Careenage and Bridgetown. Its entrance is graced with striking red doors and the inside has a fine utilisation of space which is comfortable and aesthetically pleasing with its sophisticated hues of red, white and black. The air-conditioned comfort does not hurt either.

            The good customer service does not start and end at telephone etiquette. It is clear that Andrea knows that good treatment and connecting with clientele will bring repeat business. All staff members were polite and professional during my first visit. During my second, I was made to feel as if this was my salon for years, enjoying good conversation with receptionist, Kelly, and beautician Pet. No one would have believed that they had only interacted with me once before. A salon is a respite from the daily grind. It is always a bonus when a salon does not only do good hair, but also has a good atmosphere.

            Now that you can envision the setting, let us get to the important part, the hair. I can say definitively, that Andrea gave me one of the best full-head weaves I have had in a long time. The cornrows were plaited neatly, the tracks were well-applied, and my hair was cut in the style I desired, which framed my features well. This is one month in and I have not had one loose track. I should also note that where some stylists apply glue to the closure, which can be damaging to the hair, Andrea sews in her closure, which is healthier.

            I do not believe that you can truly know a place from one visit, although first impressions are important. For my second visit, Pet, Andrea’s right hand, washed and styled my hair. She was very thorough, using a brush to scrub the scalp under the weave. She also ensured that my hair was completely dry underneath through hood-drying before blow-drying the weave itself.

            I like Diva the Salon, but it has its imperfections. Andrea is the only “weaveologist” so attention can be divided between others clients and you. In my case, it meant that I spent over six hours there during my first visit. To be fair, I also had an oil treatment done. My second visit was not as lengthy, but still took 5 hours. In this case, my genetics was the issue, since my thick hair underneath my weave seemed to take forever to dry. Secondly, the salon is not cheap, although not the most expensive. You do have to pay a little more than some other salons, but the ambience, air-conditioning, and the excellence of the weave is well worth it.

            To get an idea of the skills of Andrea and her staff, you may visit their Facebook page. They also offer manicure and pedicure services.  I give Diva the Salon four out of five Barbados flags for its service, ambience, skill and my overall satisfaction.

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RSPCA – Save a life, Make a Friend

saving a dog

This page is for the animal lovers. If you are looking for a pet, or looking for a companion for your furrier family members, before seeking to purchase, why not take a drive on the Spring Garden Highway and stop by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals? Before leaving the island, my husband and I had the privilege of utilising some of their services. We employed the Society’s veterinary services for our dogs and adopted a lovely white older dog of indeterminate origin named Venus. Sadly, we also had their assistance when we had to find a home for our beautiful Great Dane mix in 2003. Naresh Belgrave, an employee at the RSPCA, was very considerate and kept us updated, letting us know when our Thunder found a good home a week later. The RSPCA also has kennels for those owners who need somewhere for their pets to stay while they are overseas, renovating their homes, or to spare their furry friends in the hustle and bustle of a busy move.

               My daughter is interested in becoming a vet and my sons love animals, so we were quite pleased when Dr. Joyanne Pollard gave of her preciously little spare time to accommodate a visit from my family last weekend. (Thank you again, Dr. Pollard!) The short tour was enjoyable and informative. At that time Dr. Pollard said that there were 48 animals waiting to be adopted. Of course, these numbers constantly change as animals are adopted and new ones arrive. Case in point, we saw these gorgeous brothers last weekend and by this weekend, they are enjoying new homes after adoption.

Photo by Naresh Belgrave, RSPCA

Photo by Naresh Belgrave, RSPCA

               There are others waiting for adoption, however, so feel free to visit them at their Cheltenham Lodge location, next to Courts Warehouse. You can also call the RSPCA at (246) 426-3077 or visit their frequently updated Facebook page for more information. Most of the dogs and all of the puppies, since they are more susceptible to diseases such as Parvo, are vaccinated. The cats and kittens are wormed and treated for fleas, however, if the new owner wants the adoptee to be vaccinated, then the new owner may pay to have this done. All adult animals are neutered before going to their new homes. Volunteers (from age 11) and donations are always welcome. So why not save a life, and make a friend today?

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